POLCAN2ID#: 533
Date: 2015-03-06
Time: 00:00:00
Sent by:
Category: Call for Papers
Subject: Reminder: Violence in Latin America Conference Call for Papers



The Latin American Political Science Students’ Association (LAPSSA) in collaboration with the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Students’ Association (CRIMSA) and the Latin American Studies Program (LAS) present:
 
To Discipline, Punish, or Deter? Typologies of Violence in the Global South
May 7-8th, 2015 | University of Toronto
 
Violence is as ubiquitous in the present ontology as it ever was. The missing Mexican student, the lynched LGBTQ activist in Jamaica, and the displaced Nigerian villager are a testament to the fact that violence remains a viable medium for how social, economic, and political disputes are resolved everyday in the Global South. Even in the face of substantial political and economic achievements accrued over the course of the past generation, violence continues to retain great currency in the developing world. To wit, in the past year some 46 out of the 50 most dangerous cities on the planet were located in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. Unfortunately, the 2014 index is not a stark departure from previous years. These regions have long registered extremely high levels of violence to the extent that this phenomenon no longer captures the public imagination as it once did. Endemic violence in the Global South has become normalized, despite the hundreds of thousands of victims affected by this phenomenon every year.
 
This academic exchange invites presentations that explore the following themes of violence in the Global South in order to create a positive, unprejudiced space for the exchange of opinions, perspectives, and world-views over issues that crosscut regional politics.
 
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  • The use of violence targeted against women, children, the LGBTQ community, and ethnic or religious minorities.
  • The pacification or deterioration of cities: How do urban centers become safer or more dangerous.
  • Development, structural inequality, and violence: Causes, effects, and outcomes.
  • Extra-official violence, the state, and law enforcement policy: Efficacy vs. Ethics.
  • The role of the justice and prison systems on violence.
  • The lineages of organized crime in the Global South and its impact on state sovereignty.
  • The discourse of violence: media and the process of ‘victimization’. 
About the workshop and submission guidelines:
 
The workshop is structured to facilitate a fruitful and focused discussion by having a series of presentations followed by a moderated discussion with the audience regarding the themes of the panel. Please submit a 250-word proposal that has a focus on one or more of the themes articulated above by Sunday, March 16th, 2015 to disciplinepunishdeter@gmail.com. If your proposed presentation is accepted to the event, we will then place your paper onto a panel that best fits the theme that you will be addressing. Panel themes and/or submissions are also welcome. Finally, panelists unable to physically attend will have the option to do so via webcam. 




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